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Full text of "The Tower, 1946"

^TOWER 



1946 



»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» 

Annual Publication 



OF 



THE STOUT INSTITUTE 



Ml SOMONIE, \VIS< ONSIN 






GILES WOOLF — editor 

lOSII'll PETRYK — BOINESS M.\XA«I,R 



DEDICATION 



The achievement has been final victory. As we stand in the light of a new 
life and take up the challenge of peace, we hold dear the memory of those who 
made the supreme sacrifice to gain this goal. The Gold Stars have provided 
light for the path to peace. Their deeds will remain brilliant forever in the 
hearts of their fellow-students. 

To the heroes of The Stout Institute who died in the service of their 
country we dedicate the 1946 Tower. By their sacrifice, they have insured the 
preservation of the American way of life. They have not died in vain. 






Jh Memo nam of the Mien 



MELYIN LEROY ANDERSON GERALD LAWLER GOVIN CHARLES PLEIER 



R( >i:i RT BRUCE ANTRIM [AMES T. ILLINGWORTH EDWARD S. ROCK 



« >I IN RICHARD AIMELLER KENNETH R. J< )1 INS( )N ROBERT L. ROLAND 



GERALD CARSWELL 



REED [ONI S 



LYLE J. SCHULTZ 



[AMES II. DAY 



ROBERT KEITH VALGENE ELMER SCHULTZ 



NEAL [ONES GOODRICH HJALMER MOLNER 



RICHARD NOTEBAART 



EVERT OSTROM 




GEORGE SHULTIS 



EDWARD STANEEL 



WILLIAM STREESE 



WILRLR HENRY TSCHOI'I' 



EARL MORRIS THOMPSON 



PATRICK WELCH 



WARREN Wli 



FRANK E. WINTER!. INC 




VERNE C. FRYKLUND 

i 






As the third president of The Stout Institute, I am happy to greet you. As a Stout 
alumnus. I am proud to have been awarded the highest honor that any college can I 
upon one of its graduates. 

It is indeed satisfying to all of us to sec that the Toucr is dedicated to the Gold Star 
ins ot Stout. Let us. those of us who are well and whole and living, count our bless- 
ings and make the best of the opportunities that were made possible by t: 
our less fortunate buddies. Let us be determined to prepare ourselves well to become socially 
use! ul. and to live understandingly together so that another generation ot young men 
and women will not be called by a presidential greeting to an even grimmer task than the 
last. M\ class graduated in 1916, and soon thereafter we went to war. It was the war to 
end all wars, but nations had not learned to live together: so a few years later we were 
called to another more devastating one. 

There must be no more wars. There will Ik- no more wars it all people can learn to 
live tolerantly and happily together. Education is the background for this understanding. 
rgnorance engenders suspicion and hatred. The nations with the highest percentage of 
educated people have made the greatest progress socially and economically. There arc many 
advantages, thcretore, in continuing and enlarging our own educational opportunities, and 
those of our neighbors at home and abroad. There must Ik education lor everybody, and 
of every kind. 

America is great. She is great because of her vast store of natural and physical re- 
sources supported In .1 system of free education. The schools teach the people how to ex- 
ploit these resources and how to turn them into the main materials and gadgets of human 
need and for human comfort. There are many countries with resources of variety and in 
amount equal to ours, but their resources remain in their natural state because the people 
do not know how to process them. 

Education, therefore, is the basis ot all progress: and education is of all kinds. The 
graduates of Stout go forth possessed of abilities to teach the people the art of accomplish- 
ment in industry as well as in the all-im[x)rtant function of homemaking. They share 
richly in educational contributions in any community: and the opportunities for such 

services are increasing, as is evidenced by the growing demands lor our graduates. 

Stout made a significant contribution to the winning of War II. Alumni and students 
served in all branches ot military and civilian war service. Stout now again taki 
place in education for peace. Its graduates will go forth to pro\idc educational op] 
nity tor generations to come, so that the people whom they teach can Ik intelligent and 
live happily together: they will teach at home and abroad and carry the message of peace 
and good will that can Ik given understanding^- only to people who are made ready by 
education. 

VERNE C. FRYKLUND 

President 







CLYDE A. BOWMAN 
Dean of Industrial Education 

('lytic A. Bowman became the first 
Dean of Industrial Education of The 
Stout Institute in 1919. Since that time, 
he has seen Stout grow from a two 
year training school to a recognized 
four year teacher training college. 
This year, the outstanding graduate 
school which Dean Bowman has devel- 
oped as Director of Summer Sessions 
was inaugurated as part of the regular 
session, making a fifth year available 
lor graduate students. 



MERLE M. PRICE 
Dean of Men 

Dean Merle M. Price has won the 
respect of the college through his will- 
ingness to help others. When the ex- 
panding post war enrollment created a 
serious housing problem. Dean Price 
undertook the difficult task of obtain- 
ing housing facilities for veterans. Dean 
Price has studied at the University of 
Minnesota and the State Teachers Col- 
in St. Cloud, Minnesota. His valu- 
able teaching and administratis 
periences are reflected in his efficient 
administration as Dean of Men. 




m 



RUTH E. MICHAELS 
Dean of Home Economics 

Recognized as an authority in the 
field of home economics education, 
Miss Ruth E. Michaels has made a valu- 
able contribution to the Division of 
Home Economics of the college. As 
Dean of Home Economics, Miss Mi- 
chaels has developed an educational 
program designed to meet student 
needs in family and community living 
and to offer worthwhile training in the 
many professional fields open to home 
economists. 





KETURAH ANTRIM 
Dean of Women 

Appointed this year as Dean of 
Women, Miss Keturah Antrim has 
gained the respect of the women of the 
college through her work with wom- 
en's athletic and social groups. Miss 
Antrim has been a member of the fac- 
ulty of The Stout Institute since 1936. 
Her interest in student activities ami 
experience as director of physical edu- 
n for women add to her desirable 
qualifications as Dean of Women. 



r.9] 




ARNESON. HERMAN 
Biology 

BAKER. WILLIAM R. 

BROWN. ARTHUR G. 
Industrial Education 

BUCHANAN. LOUISE 
Foods 

CALLAHAN. GERTRUDE L. 
English 

CARLSEN. DARVEy E. 
Printing 

CARSON. LILLIAN 
Re atcd Art 

CHINNOCK. DWIGHT D. 
General Metals 

COOKE. HAROLD R. 
Music 

COX. ELEANOR H. 

■ 

CRUISE. M. WINNONA 

ERICKSON. MARCELINE 
Speech 



GOOD. HARRY F. 

3encr#l Mechanics 

GREEN. DANIEL 

■ 

GRUBE. FRANK 
English 

HADDEN. ANN 
Institutional Management 

HARPER. MARGARET E. 
Home Economics Education 

JETER. LILLIAN 

Clothing 

JOHNSON. DOROTHy 
Home Economics Edi. 

JOHNSON. RAY C. 
Physical Educa: c^ 



FACULTY 



KEITH. FLOYD 

General Metals 



KRANZUSCH. RAY F. 
city and General 
Mechar 

MARSHALL. ANNE 
Biology 

McCALMONT. MARY 
Chemistry 



MILNES. H. C. 
Metals 



MOORE. MILDRED 
Home Economics Edu 

NELSON. PAUL C. 
General Woodwork 

OETTING. E. R. 
Psychology 



RASMUSSEN. SIGRID 
M 

RAY. J. EDGAR 

RICH. C. L. 
Physics and Matr 

ROGERS. MABEL C. 
Foods 

SCHWEBKE. MRS. PHYLLIS 
Home Economics Education 

SMITH. MRS. BENITA G. 
School 

SODERBERG. GEORGE 
General Woodwork 

STEPHAN. A. STEPHEN 
Social Sccnce 

TRULLINGER. GLADYS 

- :3ement 

TUST1SON. F. E. 
Physics and Mathe~a: cs 

VAN NESS. HAZEL 
"Clothing 

WIGEN. RAY A. 

Industrial Educaton 












FACULTY 

Cii] 



BRyANT. DR. GEORGE 
College Physician 



O'BRIEN. GERTRUDE M. FUNK. B. M. 

Registrar and Chairman of the Business Manager 

Placement Committee 
BECKER. MINNIE FROGGATT. LILLIAN M. 

Secretary to the President Librarian 



1*3 



HOWISON. BUELAH C. 
Assistant Librarian 

STRAND. MYRTLE 
Assistant Librarian 




KOTHLOW. JANET 
Stenographer 

SPEIDEL. SARAH 
Stenographer 



WINSTON. AGNES 



PROUDLOCK. DELMA 
College Nurse 



STROZINSKy. H. O. 
Engineer 



BUSINESS 
STAFF 



ti.»:i 




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»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» 



Class Cife 



President 

PAUL ERICKSON 

Hammond. Wisconsin 



Vice-President 
SHIRLEY UBER 
Glenwood City Wsco-s - 



Secretary 

NANCY ROBERTS 
Lake Crystal. Minnesota 

Treasurer 

ROBERT HULL 
Madison. Wiscc^-s n 




SENIORS 



President 
PAUL ERICK8 >N 



Vice President 
SHIRLEY UBER 



Secretary 
NANCY ROBERTS 



Tree 

ROBERT HULL 



. Id riser 

MISS HADDEN 



The Seniors spent a fairly active social year, beginning the year with their preparation in 
decorating for Homecoming. Early in the fall, they sponsored a moonlight hike to Point Com- 
fort. So many enjoyed that all-college affair that the class sponsored a second hike to the Point 
late in the spring. 

In January, the class enjoyed a dinner at La Corte at which the mid-year graduates were 
guests. Others attending the dinner were President and Mrs. Fryklund. Dean Bowman, Dean 
Michaels. Miss Haddcn, and Miss O'Brien. 

C15D 







BROWNELL. MARJORIE 

G'and Meadow. Michigan 



BURKE. ROBERT 
Illinois 



BUSSE. ELEANOR 
New Richmond. Wise 



CHRISTOPHERSON. JAMES 

Menomome W s 



DAVIDSON. MARVIN 

Esko. Minnesota 

DE BOER. MILDRED 
Onalaska. Wisconsin 



DRESDEN. WILLIAM 
Arkansas. Wisconsin 



ADAMS. HARLAN 
Wisconsin 



ANDERSON. CHESTER 
• Wisconsin 



AMBERG. MARY JEAN 
Hillsbco. W 



AMUNDSON. BEVERLY 
Neenah. Wisconsin 

BARNARD. DAVID 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



BATTENBERG. REXFORD 
Milwaukee. Wj 



BINSTOCK. HOWARD 

Menc- iconsin 



BOYLE. POLLYANN 
Glenwood City. Wisconsin 

BRONKEN. ANITA 

Co'fa«. Wisconsin 



BROWN. MARTIN 
Wauwatosa. Wisconsin 



BROWN. ORAL 
Mcnomonie. Wisconsin 



BROWN. RICHARD 
Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 




DRIVAS. MARIA 
Waupaca. Wisconsin 



DUMMANN. FRANK 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 

EDBERG. PEGGY 

Radisson. Wisconsin 



EKHOLM. LEONE 
Washburn, Wisconsin 



ENGEBRETSON. MARY 
New Auburn, Wisconsin 



EVERTS. ELDON 
Minneapolis. Minnesota 



GEHRKE. PAUL 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

GINNOW. CLOVA DELL 
Appleton. Wisconsin 



GOCHNAUER. MYRTH 
Appleton. Wisconsin 



HAGEMANN. JEAN 
Ft. Atkinson. Wisconsin 

HAPPEL. JUNE 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



HASSLINGER. ELIZABETH 
Nashotah. Wisconsin 





HA/WOOD. DONNA 
Belgrade, Minnesota 



HERRING. JEAN 
Stockton. California 



HUGHES. BYRON 
Cambria. Wisconsin 



HUNTZICKER. MARY 
Greenwood. Wisconsin 



JAIN. DOROTHEA 
Elk Mound. Wisconsin 

JENNRICH. VERNICE 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



KANER. ROY 
Elmwood. Wisconsin 




KNUTSON. CLINTON 

B a ■ Wisconsin 



KRAMSCHUSTER. BETTY 

Augusta, Wisconsin 

LA PAGE. VERNELLE 

Tomahawk. Wisconsin 



LARSEN. ESTHER 

Kenosha. Wisconsin 



LEE. ELIZABETH 

.'.sconsin 



LEE. MARIAN 

Coon Valley. Wisconsin 



LEOPOLD. WAYNE 

Sanborn. Minnesota 



McKIBBEN. DONALD 

St. Cloud. Minnesota 



MERTZ. DOLORES 
Wauwatosa. Wisconsin 



MERTZ. LA VERNE 
Wauwatosa. W i 



MUELLER. LOTHAR 
Wausau. Wisconsin 



NEITZEL. MYRTLE 
Edgar. Wisconsin 



OLSON. YVONNE 

.'. sconsin 

ONARHEIM. GLORIA 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



PACE. PEGGY 
Stanlc, 



PAFF, VALARIE 
Dorchester, Wisconsin 



PETRYK. JOSEPH 
Goodman, Wisconsin 



PROKSCH, MARALYN 
La Crosse. W s:c-s - 




RICCELLI. JOHN 

Eveleth. Minnesota 



ROEN. HOWARD 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

RYAN. RITA 
Lodi, Wis 



SANDEEN. ERNEST 
Supei 01 Wisconsin 



SCHARR. CHARLES 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



SCHREIBER. EVELYN 

Ladysrrnth. Ws 



SERFLEK. JOSEPH 

Cudahy, Wisconsin 



SNOEYENBOS. GORDON 
Glenwood City. Wiscons n 

SPAULDING. MARY JANE 
Milwaukee. W s 



STEVENS. HARRIET 
Omro, Wisconsin 



TREZONA. MARGARET 
Houghton, Michigan 

ULSRUD. YVONNE 
Menomonie. Wiscc-s - 



M CI 








WEGNER. RUDOLPH 

B'fchwood ^ 

WICKLUND. CARL 
Leoneth. Minnesota 



WIDVEY. SYBIL 

St. C*on Falls. Wisconsn 



WILDNER. JOYCE 

Menomonie. W s 

WINEK. JOSEPH 

'. Wisconsin 



WOLFF. ERWIN 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 




President 

PATRICIA TELFORD 
Oconto. Wi$con$.n 



Vice-President 
RICHARD McKINNEY 

Chippewa Fa s. Wisconsin 



Secretary 

SHIRLEY WASEEN 
Superior. Wisconsin 



Treasurer 

MARCEILE SANDER 
Fond du Lac. W 



JUNIORS 



/'• t siient 
PATRICIA TELFORD 



Vice President 
RICHARD McKINNl V 



St 1 1 1 tai ) 
SHIKI.i V YYASKI X 



Treasurer 
MARCEILE SANDER 



Adviser 
DR. MARSHALL 



Homecoming offered the Juniors opportunity to show true enthusiasm for their college. 
Choosing a Stout football for a theme, they transformed the gym into a suitable environment 
for the Homecoming dance. 

With the aid of gaily colored balloons and rolls of confetti, the Juniors again tried their 
hands at interior decorating. This time the occasion was the all-college masquerade dance 
sponsored by the S.S.A. 

For the first spring in three years, the Juniors had the privilege of sponsoring the Junior 
Prom which was held May 11. Zeke Prust was elected prom king. Zeke chose Mary Ann 

Dodge as his queen to reign with him at the Prom. 



t2o;] 



AANESS. RUTH 
La Crosse. Wisconsin 



ANDERSON. WILLIAM 
Mcnomonic. Wisconsin 

BAETSEN. BERNARD 
Green Bay. Wisconsin 



BAIRD. JOHN 

River Falls. Wisconsin 



BRILL. DONALD 

Elk Mound. Wisconsin 



BURTNESS. CLIFFORD 
Tomahawk. Wisconsin 



CAMERON. BRUCE 
Appleton. Wisconsin 



CASS. DONALD 
Viroqua. Wisconsin 



CHRISTIANSON. MAURICE 
Glenwood City. Wisconsin 



CHRISTIANSON. WILLIAM 
Glenwood City. Wisconsin 

CONDRY. DOROTHY 
Platteville. Wisconsin 

COX. MARGARET 
Osseo. Wisconsin 





&i*M.*ZA 




DODGE. MARY ANN 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

ERICKSON. ALBERT 

Virginia. Minnesota 



FJELSTED. BEVERLY 
Cameron. Wisconsin 



FOSS. MARY 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

GASSEN. CARL 
Neillsville. Wisconsin 



GOULD. MARJORIE 
Kenosha. Wisconsin 



HART. ANNABELLE 
Glen Haven. Wisconsin 

HOLTZ. MARLAnE 
Waseca. Minnesota 



INGRAM. DONALD 
Durand. Wisconsin 




l4*Jk 





MERK. ROBERT 

Wisconsin Rapids. Wiscc-s in 

MEYER. MARY LOU 
-und. W ic 



MILLER. EUGENE 

Menomcr c. W sconsin 



MILLER. MILTON 
Racine. Wisconsin 



NELSON. LUCILLE 

Minneapol s 



O-CONNELL, THOMAS 
KenosHa. Wisconsin 



O'CONNOR. PATRICIA 
Minnesota 

ODE. LOUIS 

- Wisconsin 



OETTMEIER. PRISCILLA 
• nion, W sconsin 



JERDE. ILA 
Comstock, Wisconsin 



JOHNSON. MILDRED 
Knapp. Wisconsin 



JOHNSON. PHYLLIS 
Monroe. Wisconsin 



KANOUSE. ELSIE 
Menomonie. Wis 

KLINNER. RUTH 

Stetsonville. Wisconsin 



KLUSMEYER. LOIS 
Evansville. Wisconsin 



KOPISCHKIE. DOROTHY 
Chippewa Falls. W 

KRAJNACK. JOSEPH 
Cudahy, Wisconsin 



KRANZUSCH. HELEN 
-onie. W i 



Mcdowell, buelah 

De Soto. Wisco-sin 

MASEK. WILLIAM 
Wonewoc, Wisconsin 



MEDTLIE. ARTHUR 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 




PARSKE. LA VERNE 
-.jVe<. Wisconsin 



PAULy. CATHERINE 
Sl'mger. Wisconsin 



POWERS, MARJORIE 
Wauwatosa. W s 



PRUST. ZENAS 

berg. Wisconsin 

PUTZIER. ELMER 
Mondovi, Wisconsin 



REDMOND. MARJORIE 
Fond dv Lac. W i 



RICHARDSON. CHARLES 
Rice Lake. Wisconsin 

RISTOW. HARVEY 
La Crosse. Wisconsin 



RODEy. LOUIS 
Menomonie. Wisccns n 



ROSS. MARIAN 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



RUSSELL. VIRGINIA 
Fond du Lac. Wisconsin 



SANDERS. BENJAMIN 
Kenosha. Wisconsin 





2&£ 



SAXHAUG. EDWARD 

SCHAEFER. JANICE 
Osseo. Wisconsin 

SCHELLIN. BETTE 
£ ard. Wisconsin 



SEITZ. KARL 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

THOMPSON. JOAN 

• Wisconsin 



UMBEHOCKER. BETTY 
Princeton, Minnesota 



WENDT. FRANK 
Menomonie. W i 



WENDT. HERBERT 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



WOOLF. GILES 
Stoughton. Wis- 




First Row: Carol W.ddcr. Ha Sautter. Mary Rudow. Arlcne Pick. Adeline Scha 

Second Row: Err , Siamar. Heler Q_ ng, Marjorie Thull. Marjorie Sandman, Miriam TcBcest Benjamin 

Sar- 
Third Row: William Petrylc, Otto Rccke. Richard Rothw.. Axeltcn. 



SOPHOMORES 



President 






I .< e President 


BENJAMIN SANDERS 






JOSEPH BERTOLETTI 


Secretary 






Treasurer 


MARGARET PENNINGTON 






ELGIE PETEF 




. tdviser 






DR. 


RAY 





The Sophomore Home Economics girls, cooperating with the Home Economics Club, 
spread the joy of Christmas spirit on the Stout Campus this year with the "Jule Katfee Lag." 
The gay tidings of the holiday season were expressed in the singing of Christmas carols, the 
decorations of evergreen boughs and wreaths, and the colorfully decorated Christmas tree. 

As members of the clean-up committee, the Sophomores contributed to the success of 
Homecoming as well as to the success of an S.S.A. party. 

In keeping with the spring season, the class sponsored a successful May Day Dance and 
celebrated the conclusion of an active year with the traditional class picnic. 



C20 




First Row: jcar Goniolin, Mar an Mueller, Maxine Houle. Adele Anderson, Geneviev. irgaret 

Pennington, Jean Cantrell. 

Second Row: -nmel. Alice Froeba. Mary Chinnock. Mariar iyn Thomas. Alice McV ;s- 

Afla Fae Aasmundrud. 
Third Row: Helen Melville. Margaret Hanson. Joy Ericlcson, Jeanne 3 Frase. Mary I: 

Irma Curtiss. Betty Kuenzl, June Edeberg. 



First Row: Kathleen Hogue. Joseph Mocogni, Rose Krog. 

Second Row: Verena Price, Irene Traxier, Betty Miller. Ellen Prebbanow Bernice Johnson. Elaine Voss, 

Shirley Schi 
Third Row: Ray Johnson. Wesley Kuckuk E-gene Miller. James Bruno Robert Thompto. Ma" 



f^ 





First Row; h, Veto Chaffee. Rosann Bonscy. Donna Brantncr. Audrey Conl 

Aughnay. Joyce Bray. 
Second Row: Ol.vc Brownell. Bernice Benson. Lorraine Gsan. James Brqcha. Dorothy Bcyrci. Eileen Bcyrer. 

Bagstad. 
Third Row: Arthur Bactz. Eugene Chaffee. Ferd And - Jack Bongey. Victor Coi 

Herbert Barnh 



FRESHMEN 



WILLIAM HALVORS* >N 

Secretary 
JOAN WILDNER 



ident 
EUG1 NE DYKE 

surer 
DONALD GOVIN 



. idviser 
MR. SODERBERG 






During the second week in September, the Freshmen were initiated into college life. 
During the orientation period, they excitedly attended the S.S.A. get-acquainted dance, the 

campus siMcr tea, and the faculty welcome party. 

The joy of their first Homecoming was overshadowed by the "accidental" burning of the 
material gathered for a huge bonfire. Hut. disappointed though they were, they set themselves 
the task of preparing for another bonfire, and thev succeeded! 

The Freshmen contributed to Stout's social life during the year with a Freshman sweater 
dance, an all-college party, ami several record hops after basketball games. 




First Row: Hazel Damgaard. Aflene Fausett. Mildred Hanson, Jean Cyr. Eileen Dillman. Avis Harshman. 

Audrey Harlander. 
Second Row: Betty Dengel. Elizabeth Hanson. Philena Elliott. Mary Lou Friberg, Henrietta Guelzow. 

Alberta Cummings, Doris Coonsell. 
Third Row: Neil Govin. Olive Jane Ettinger. John Harris. Kitty Gcrondale, William Halvorson. Doris 

Eggebrecht. Donald C 



First Row: Zona Hines. Amy Lou Horton, Marilyn Haywood. Lois Henslcy. Janice Jewel. Donna Kragh. 
Second Row: Carol Heidmann. Marilyn Hecbink. June Joh- - a Jackson. Dorothy Kopp. Ruth 

Knowles. Phyllis Hoffman. Mary Ann Houle. 
Third Row: Bcm.cc Johnson. Torval Hendrickson. Douglas Larson, Roland Kehrberg. Mark Huger. Robct 

Jackson. James Knif'en. Helen Kelley. 




First Row: Lucille Lindberg. Yvonne Olson, Phyllis Miller. Elaine Leemkuil. Harriet Okuyama. Jean Murphy, 

Rose Olbert. 
Second Row: Marian Lcmke. Ruth Nueman. Patricia Moore, Jean Lindblad. Ruth Mathey. Phyllis Onsager. 

Mary Olson, Jean Nylandcr. 
Third Row: Esther Medtlie. Arlene Mueller, Harold Osborn, Eugene Dyke, Lee Mueller. Kilmer Moe. Norma 

Nelson. 



First Row: Lorraine Schlough, Mary Seifert. Gloria Riemer. Violet Schnitzler. Rose Scianni. 

Second Row: Shirley Soderberg. Mary Jane Rittler. Beverly Rusdal. Marian Pientock. Naomi Schera. 

Jean Schwalbe, Grace Smith. 
Third Row: Harvey Peterson. Eugene Skjclstad. James Schellin. Donald Raether. Clyde Schwellenbach. 

Stephen Spencer. Harold Satterlund. Kenneth Schank. 





First Row: Jean Woodruff. Teresa Jean Welch, Jean Sterner, Ard's Stagcman, Dorothy Wilson. 

Second Row: Den s Z •^merman, Hclcr T in Wildncr Phy s Scc"s*.ad, Florence Teegarden. Phyllis 

Wa . - - 31 Ranst. 

Third Row: Chcoyn Thompson. Barbara Zwas<a. Gerald Wiseman. Arthur Sweitzer, Odell Stevens, Francis 
Zepp. Betty Stan', Audrey Vig. 



First Row: Robert yorkston, Norman Rcnk. Russell Hall. John Rudow. Harold Borchhardt, Richard Gandt. 
Second Row: Ma* Nichol. George Hendnckson. Violet Schmidt. Mclvin Olson. Martin Conway, Clyde 

Wale 
Third Row: ttenscn, Frank Boy. Walter Gorr. Carrol B'user. Elmer Eggert. 



C29D 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The graduate school at The Stout Institute is established to meet the 
present-day requirements for teachers ami administrators of Industrial Educa- 

.md Home Economics Education. The initial offering of graduate work 
was made in the 1935 summer session when the Wisconsin Legislature of 1935 
granted The Stout Institute the authority to inaugurate a fifth year of work 
on the graduate level. Graduate work continued to be carried on exclusively 
during the summer sessions until this year. As a result of the increasing de- 
mand lor graduate work, a full-time graduate program has been inaugurated. 
The first regular SCS raduate courses were offered during the second 

semester of the lV45--4f> college 

Students who hold the degree of Bachelor of Science from The Stout In- 
stitute, or its equivalent, are eligible to take graduate courses. Undergraduate 
records from colleges cither than The Stout Institute are accepted upon approval 
of the graduate committee. The graduate curriculum is planned so prospective 
teachers ami administrators may earn the degree of Master of Science with a 
major in Industrial Education. Home Economics Education, or Vocational 
Education. 







c o a 



ABE. YASO 
Honolulu, Hawaii. 



ANDERSON, LUTHER 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

8ARISAS. BERNARD 

Shreveport. Louis ana 



BROWN. DEAN 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



CAMPBELL. DORA 
Menomonie. W •. 

CHASE. JOHN 

Oshltcs- 



DRAKE. DOUGLAS 

:DO'"S. M " 



FLANAGAN. WILLIAM 

P.clctt. Ws 

HAWORTH. MERVIN 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 









0K 


HODGKINS. EDWIN 
Portlar.d. Mame 

KOCH. CLINTON 

Dccoran Iowa 






n 
t* 


LIEN. ARNOLD 
Menomonie. Wis- 




f 


mMMM 

H f 


METTEL. EARL 
Saul Gty, Wisconsin 




' 


" v 


OASS. GORDON 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 


A 


s;> i 








is ^ -^ 



ft 



O O f* 

£> o c. 




MOE. CLIFFORD 
Raone. Wisconsin 



OLSTAD. HARRY 
Wauwatosa W:$consin 



PEDERMAN. JAMES 
lukee. Wisconsin 



FOWELL. PAUL 
Mcnomonic. Wisconsin 



QUILLING. FRED 
Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 



RUMSAY. ROBERT 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



SCHEUERELL. EDWARD 
i Wisconsin 

SCHLOUGH. WESLEY 
Park Falls. Wisconi - 



SCHWEBKE. HOWARD 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



TREZONA. RICHARD 
Houghton. Michigan 



WERELEY. EUGENE 
Burlington. Wisconsin 



WEST. THE REV. ROBERT 
Richardton. North Dakota 

WHEELER. MARK 

New Orleans. Louisiana 



WORMAN. DARBY 
Sand Creek. Ws 



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Stout Cife 




C35D 










C36D 




C37] 




HOMECOMING 



"OKI Times. Old Friends, More Fun." the 1945 Homecoming theme, was more signifi- 
cant this year than ever before. OKI friends of Stout, returning after an absence during the 
war years, brought with them the warm feeling of old times. 

Events began on Friday. October 26 when students, alumni, faculty members and spe- 
cial guests packed the auditorium to applaud "'The First Year." a realistic play presented bv 
'he Manual Arts Players. After the final curtain, the torchlight parade wended its way to 
the fairgrounds where Wayne Leopold, captain of the football team, lighted the traditional 

C38D 




HOMECOMING 



bonfire. As the flames reached toward the sky, Marjorie Thull was crowned Queen of the 
1945 Homecoming by S.S.A. President Frank Dummann. 

Saturday presented an afternoon parade to Nelson Field for a heart-breaking football 
game with Eau Claire. At half-time, an impressive ceremony was held in honor of the gold 
star veterans of The Stout Institute. In the evening, the Homecoming crowd thronged to the 
gymnasium for the dance which ended the day in gala style. Final Homecoming events 
were held on Sunday morning when many organizations held fraternal breakfasts. 

CS9J 




first Row: a bid Halversor W.lliam Pctryk. Roland Kehrberg. Ferd A- -arvey Peterson. Odell 

Stevens. Wayne Leopold. Richard Becker, Joseph Serflek, Eldon Everc::s Marvin Thorson. 

Second Row: James Schellin, Arthui Sweitzer. Jc- Donald W> a~s Scald Wiseman, Donald 

3tto Rockc. A-roid Be-telsen. Eugene Chaffee, Martin Browr - (Howard Brune. 

John Harris. Robert Thompto. 

Third Row: Ray F. Johnson, Kurt Wemerberg. Coach Johnson. John Pe-. 



FOOTBALL 

For the first time in two years. Nelson Field became the scene of Blue Devil activity 
as Stout welcomed the return of intercollegiate football to the campus. After Stout's two- 
year absence from active grid competition, Blue Devil hopes for a successful season hinged 
on new and inexperienced material. Calisthenics and strenuous practice sessions soon devel- 
oped the inexperienced squad into a fighting Stout eleven. 

The first game of the 1945 football season resulted in a smashing 24-0 victory over the 
invading Augsburg team. The Blue Devils dddvd their second win when they journeyed to 
Eau Claire to eke out a 7-6 victory over the teachers* college eleven. The Blue Devils lost 
their third game to a hard charging Superior State Teachers College team when they were 
out-classed 20-0 on the Yellow Jacket field. 

Although ideal weather prevailed for Stout's Homecoming game with Eau Claire, the 
Peds cast a gloomy shadow over the celebration by defeating the Blue Devils 6-0 in a heart- 
breaking battle. 



1*01 



FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD 

Stout's first post-war football team was not a championship team from a standpoint of 
victories; but its well-fought battles evidenced the promise of greater power and success in 
future years. 



Augsburg (here) 0-24 Stout 

Eau Claire (there) 6-7 Stout 

Superior (there) 20-0 Stout 

River Falls (here) 14-6 Stout 

Eau Claire (here — homecoming) .... 6-0 Stout 




C4ID 




Fint Row: Eugene Miller, John G ;nald Grunsted. Alvin Wutti, Joseph Serflek. E^aon Everetts. 

Harlan Ada^s. 

Second Row: Coach Johnson. William Halvorson. Arthur Swcittcr. Walter Dusold. 2- ■ onald 

Paige 



BASKETBALL 



The Stout Blue Devils opened their 1945-46 cage season by playing host to the Fort 
Snelling All-Stars. The speedy army team dealt the Blue Devils a 49-32 set back after Stout 
had fought for the lead at half-time. Stout's second defeat came when they invaded St. Paul 
to challenge a powerful Hamline University quintet. 

After its first defeats, Stout gathered power and experience which enabled the Blue 
Devils to out-class the favored Superior Yellow Jackets 39 to 24 for their first victory. Ac- 
curate basket-shooting and commendable work on the free throw line built up a substantial 
lead which the Blue Devils held to the finish of the game. For its third victory. Stout jour- 
neyed to Stevens Point and, in a thrill-packed game, nosed out the Pointers in the last few 
minutes of play 48-46. As in the previous game played between the two colleges, both teams 
battled back and forth on even terms until the final minutes of decisive play. 

Although tied at half-time, the Stout Blue Devils tipped the La Crosse State Teachers 
College quintet 48-42 to rack up its fifth victory. The La Crosse Indians went into the lead 
in the opening minutes of the game: but Stout tied the score at the close of the second quar- 
ts] 



BASKETBALL SCOREBOARD 

ter. During the second half, the Blue Devils gradually forged ii.ro the lead which broughi 
the season's final victory to Coach Johnson's hard fighting quad. 



Fort Snelling (here) 49o2 Stout 

Hamline (there) 51-18 Stout 

La Crosse (here) 34-29 Stout 



Stevens Point (here) 42-40 

Superior (here) 

Eau Claire (here) J 

Stevens Point (there) 46-48 

River Falls (there) $2-50 

La Crosse (there) 



Eau (-lair 

Superior (there) 55.4 



Stout 
Stout 
Stout 

Stout 
Stout 
Stout 



c (*«) 52-50 Stout 



Stout 




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Campus fife 




Frank Dummann, Marjor<e Powers, Esther Larsen. Marian 



STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



dent 
PRANK DUMMANN 

5 
MARIAN ELDRED 



President 
KSTHER LARSEN 

Trea 

MARJORIK POWERS 



The Stout Student Association is an organization whose primary purpose is to encourage 
a spirit of school cooperation and to secure for the students a definite and responsible voice in 
student affairs. Four Student executives are elected each spring to represent the students he- 
fore the administration. 

The main activity of S.S.A. this year was to complete the revision of the student constitu- 
tion, with the aid of the Student Governing Board. The S.S.A. officers then submitted it to 

the faculty advisers, the members of the faculty committee on student affairs. 

Among the social functions sponsored by S.S.A. were the Moonlight Hike out to Point 
Comfort, the Theater Party honoring the Seniors, the Freshman Week Dance, the Masquer- 
ade Hall, and the Christmas Dance. Of course, no Student will ever forget Stout's first post-war 
Homecoming. We really felt the spirit of old times, old friends, and more fun! 



C^H 




First Row: Ha Jerde. Maria Drivas. Esther Larsen. Peggy Edberg. Mary Ann Dodge. Pat Telford. 
Second Row: Jean Herring. Leone Ekholm. Ruth Klinner. Valarie Paff. Betty Kramschuster. Mrs. Smith, 

adviser; Mary Huntzicker, Edria Sontag. 
Third Row: Clova Dell Ginnow. Ruth Aancss. Mary Engcbrctson, Marian Lee. 



PHI UPSILON OMICRON 



President 
MARY ENGEBRETSON 

Recording Secretary 

MILDRED DE BOER 

Treasurer 

PKGGY KDI1ERG 



I ';- ( I'rt tident 
[EAN HERRING 

Corresponding Secretary 
!l ONE EKHOLM 

Advisory Council 

MISS MICHAELS 

MISS TRULUNGER MISS CRUISE 

MRS. SCHWEBKE MRS. SMITH 



Phi Upsilon Omicron is a national professional home economics fraternity devoted to 
furthering home economics education. The women of Tau chapter began the activities of the 
year enthusiastically by initiating eight new members during homecoming week. Sending out 
textile boxes to home economics teachers in the state, editing a semi-annual newsletter, and sell- 
ing ice cream bars at the basketball games were the activities of the year. Phi U also sponsored 
a movie, an all-school tea anil one Home Economics Club meeting. 



[48] 



ALPHA PSl OMEGA 



dent 
RITA RYAN 

Secretary 

MYRTH GOCHNAUER 



Viet President 
VERNELLE LaPAGE 

Treasurer 
MARIA DRIVAS 



MISS ERICKS< )\ 



The Zeta Beta Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity, re- 
ceived its charter in the spring of 1935. Since then, membership in this local chapter has 
been the aim of every Manual Arts Player. The organization brings entertainment of ex- 
cellent quality to the college. This year's commendable production of "The First Year*' was a 
major event of the annual Homecoming celebration. 

Members of the Manual Arts Plavcrs completing specified acting ami crew require- 
ments are admitted into the fraternity. Alpha Psi Omega aims to develop appreciation for 
the best in dramatic literature, to attain skill in the art of impersonation, and to provide fun- 
damental training which may serve as a basis tor future activity in all phases of amateur 
pnxluction. 



Firjt Row: Arthur Mcdtlie. Helen Kranzu$ch. Vernelle LaPage. Mus Erickjon. • Ryan. Betty Lee. 

Myrth Gochnauer. 

Second Row: Betty Kramjchuiter Patfic a Telford. Dora Campb- Frank 

»nn, Valarie Paff. 




C49 3 




First Row: 2~.z as Drake. Wiillam Dresden, Mr. Kranzusc Richard Brown. RcHa*d Trexona. 

Second Row: Robert Thomas. Joseph Petryk, Rexford Baiteibers. Howard Roen. James Chrlstopherson, 
Zcke - 



ARTS AND CRAFTS CLUB 



President 

RICHARD BROWN 



Vice President 
ZENAS PRIM 



Secretary 

DOUGLAS DRAKE 



Adviser 

MR. KRANZUSCH 



Treasurer 

ROBERT THOMAS 



Inactive during the war years, the Arts and Crafts club was re-organized during the 
second semester by returning members. The organization is comprised of men who are in- 
terested in hobby work and is affiliated with the National Home Workshop Guild. Every 
member is given an opportunity to work on any craft in which he is interested. Through its 
activities, the Arts and Crafts club promotes the worthy use of leisure time and sponsors several 
school activities. Stout men with a grade point average of 1.6 are eligible for election to 
membership. 

C50] 



STOUT TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 



dent 
LOTHAR MUELLER 



clary 

DAVID BARNARD 



Vice President 
GILES wool. I 

Treasurer 
BYRON HUGHES 



. idvisers 
MR. BAKER, MR. CARLSEN 



The Stout Typographical Society, which was inactive during the war. was reorganized by 
returned veterans at the beginning of the second semester of the 1945-46 school year. The so- 
ciety was organized in 1926 to promote closer friendship among students majoring in print- 
ing, to analyze problems of printing teachers, and to stimulate in its members a desire for a 
thorough knowledge of printing. 

Membership degrees in the society correspond to levels in the printing trade — apprentice, 
journeyman, and master. All initiates enter as apprentices, but advancement to the next higher 
degree may be made as skill and knowledge grow. Special examinations are given for ad- 
vancement. 

Each spring and summer the society holds a Wayzgoose, or printer's picnic, which has 
become a tradition. 



Fittt Row: F-a-li Wcndt. Giles Woolf. James Timmerman. Mr. Carlsen. advsc: Mr. Baker, adviser: LotKa' 
Mueller. Zekc Prust Parn.ck Ha:a* an. 

Second Row: = 5 _ E- -«son. Bruce Cameron, Byron Hu3hcs. De Herbert Wcndt 

Richard Brown, Howard Schwcbke, Robert Rumsay. David Bernard, 




[51] 





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First Row: Mr. Bal «son. Marsaret i Lien. Harriet Stevens. Joyce Wildner. 

Ruth Klinner. Arthur Bactz. 
Second Row: Arienc Pick Mar/ Jane Spauldins. Janice Schaefer. Dorothy Kopischkic. Beverly Fjelstad. 

Catherine Pauly. Olive Jane Ettinger. Arlyss Van Ranst. Jean Cantrell. Ha Jcde. Esther Medtlie, 

Joan Wildner. Irene Traxler, Joan Thompson, Mary Ann Dodge, Marian Ross. Shirley Schnitzler. 

Audrey Harlander. 

Third Row: Phyllis Johnson, Eller. Prcbbanow, Clyde Schwellenbach. Mark Huber. Virginia Russell, Philena 

Elliott. Beverly Gikling. Marcy Sanders, Jeanne Schwalbe. Patricia T, 
Fourth Row: Ms- ,- Heebink. Audrey Vigerust. Herbert Wendt. Ray Johnson. Joe Macc- 

Zepp. Arlene Fausett. B. •■• • Henrietta Guelrow, Betty Miller, Buelah McDowell. 



STOUTONIA STAFF 



ARNOLD LIEN 



Editors 
HARRIET STEVENS 



MARY JANK SPAULDING 



Busint <s Manager 
JOYCE WILDNER 



Adviser 
MR. BAKER 



Each week there is a grand hustle over in the Stout print shop as the Stoutonia goes to 
pros. Reporters arc writing stories, typists are at work, to say nothing about the copy readers, 
stenotypists, proof readers, and make-up staff. Then there is the circulation staff and the ad- 
vertising staff to keep the paper going. The various editors are also hard at work. This year we 
have had three editors— Arnie Lien, first semester, and Harriet Stevens followed by Mary Jane 
Spaulding, the second semester. Our choice piece of work was the Christmas issue. It was a 
twelve page paper with a colored cover page. 

[52] 



TOWER STAFF 



Editor 
GILES WOOLF 



- Manager 
JOSEPH PETRYK 



. I d v isers 

MISS RASMUSSEN, MISS CALLAHAN 

MR. CHINNOCK 



The Tower has been an annual publication of The Stout Institute since 1909. In addition 
to capturing the impersonal side of college life, a college yearbook must also be as represen- 
tative as possible. With this year's college enrollment constantly expanding, the task of in- 
cluding every student's picture was a difficult one. The return of veterans to their alma mater 
also resulted in the reactivation of many college organizations. Although difficulties were 
many, the 1946 Tower staff has tried in some measure to picture the post-war life of the 
college. 



First Row: Mildred Johnson. Torval Hendrickson. Marian Eldred. Giles Woolf. Mary Chinnock, Arthur 

Medtlie. Lucille Nelson. 
Second Row: V ss Rasmussen, adviser; Marilyn Heebink. June Johnston. Mr. Chinnock. adviser: Virginia 

Russell. Clyde Schweilenbach. Jeanne Greenlee. Miss Callahan, adviser. 




C«3 




First Row: Eugene Dyke. William Halvorson. Mr. Cooke, director; Olive Brownell. Marjorie Brownell. 

Marjorie Thull. 
Second Row: Joan Thompson. Florence Teegarden. Dorothy Beyrer. Shirley Soderberg. Mary Jane Rittler. 

Donna Kragh, Dorothy Kopischltie. Priscilla Oettmeier, lla Sautter, Joan Harshman, Sarah Speidel. 
Third Row: Jeanne Greenlee. Avis Harshman. Margaret Hanson. Dorothy Kopp. Shirley Erickson. Hc- 

Guelzow. Russell Hall. James Kvool, Francis Zepp. Eugene Skjegstad. Dale Seifert. Howard Brune. 

Jean Murphy. Phyllis Miller. 



BAND 



President 

PRISCILLA OETTMEIER 



Vice President 
PAUL AXELSEN 



Secretary-Treasurer 
JOAN THOMPSON 



Librarians 

FLORENCE TEEGARDEN 

MARY LOU MKYER 



Adviser 
MR. COOKE 



The Stout Band was definitely not a strictly co-ed band this year. With the return of SO 
many veterans, men were added to the organization once again. The band, which boasts a 
membership of forty-rive students, did very well at all of its performances. It appeared at pep 
meetings, football and basketball games, and, of course, the grand Homecoming celebration. 
The band also sponsored the annual spring assembly program. Mr. Cooke, the band's versatile 
director, has promised new uniforms for the organization now that they have the funds. 



C54 3 



ORCHESTRA 



President 
NAOMI IMMEL 

Secretary Tic. 

I LOVA DELLGINNOW 



Vice President 

ADELINE SCHAEFER 

. Idviser 

MR. COOKE 



This year the activities of the orchestra have been varied. The group's first appearance wis 
to entertain at a dinner given in honor of retiring President Nelson. In December, the or- 
chestra accompanied the choir in its presentation of the Messiah. In February, the orchestra 
played in Eau Claire as a supplementary group for the Chippewa Valley Symphony. The 
climax of the year's activities was the traditional tour with the Stout Symphonic Singers. 



First Row: Clova Dell Ginnow. Mary Jane Amber. Naomi Immel. Mary Lou Ott, Adeline Schacfer. 
Second Row: Mary Engcbrctson. Venice Jennerich. Frances Ostrom, Janice Schafcr. 




[55] 




First Row: Rose Mary Olbert. Rose Krog. Peggy Edberg. Carol Widder. Shirley Waseen, Lorraine Schlough, 
Mr. Cooke, director; Joy Erickson, Joan Wildner. Naomi Immel, Jane Rittler. Jean Cyr, Margaret 
Pennington. 

Second Row: Mary Engebretson. Jeanne Gonsolin, Audrey Harlander. Helen Tirpak. Adeline Schaefer, 

Arlyss Van Ranst. Alice McVicar. Hazel Damgaard. Janice Schaefer. Jean Murphy. Florence Teegarden, 

Dons Counsell. Elaine Voss. Helen Quilling, Evelyn Thomas. Maxine Houle. 
Third Row: Lucille Nelson, Beverly Amundson. Frances Ostrum, Peggy Pace. Elaine Leemkuil. Henrietta 

Guelzow. Mary Huntzicker. Phyllis Johnson. Betty Lee. Ann Hart. Mary Lou Ott. Clova Dell Ginnow. 

Ruth Aaness. Mildred DeBoer. Marilyn Heebink. 
Fourth Row: Norman Rerk, Willard Benson. Harold Osborn. Ma-, n V ::, Herbert Barnart. George Tinetti. 

Edwin Schattschneider. Thomas King. Robert Thompto. Byron Hughes. Melvln Lemon. Harold Satterlund. 
Fifth Row: Robert Melrose. W.lliam Halverson. Paul Axelsen. Arnold Be'telsen. Harold Nagler. Roland 

Kehrberg. Arthur Med- m Bottomley. Donald Brill. 

STOUT SYMPHONIC SINGERS 



POLLY W\" BOYLE 

tary-Treai 
MIRIAM TcBl 



Co-Chairmen 



ARTHUR MEDTLIE 
. Id riser 
MR. COOKE 



Although the possibilities of a choir were uncertain early in the year, the Stout Sym- 
phonic Singers soon developed into a musical organization of pre-war size. Returning vet- 
erans added their voices to the choir and by late fall the Stout Symphonic Singers were 
prepared to present the Christmas portion of Handel's "Messiah." Augmented by other chor- 
al groups, a choir of 180 voices presented the inspiring oratorio at its yearly Christmas con- 
cert. 

Spring found choir members preparing for another concert which was presented by the 
Stout Symphonic Singers in the auditorium prior to their departure on the annual spring 
concert tour. Highlighting event of the year was the choir trip which included the making 
of recordings in Minneapolis on the return trip. 



C56] 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



President 
POLLY ANN BO VI. I 

Secretary- Treasurer 

MILDRED IX- BOER 



Vice President 

CAROL WIDDER 

. Idiiser 
MR. COOKE 



Among the musical organizations at Stout is the Women's Glee Club. This year the Glee 
Club had the honor of singing with the Stout Symphonic Singers in presenting the Messiah for 
the annual Christmas concert. 

At the beginning of the second semester, the Glee Club, under the direction of Mr. Cooke, 
started voice analysis. The women learned to recognize good tone quality and to understand 
the principles of voice control. They also practiced various vocal exercises which helped them 
to apply the principles learned. 



First Row: Avis Harshman, Irene Traxlcr. Jean Cantrell. Doris Zimmerman. Alice Froeba. Elaine Johnson. 
Mildred Johnson. Adele Anderson. Rose Scianni. 

Second Row: Marjorie Gould. Alberta Cummings. Lois Klusmeyer. Beverly GiUing. Jean Schwalbe. Arlene 

Fausett. Helen Melville. Mary Olson. Mary Seifert. Betty Dengel. 
Third Row: Betty Stahl. Jeanne Greenlee. Barbara Zwaska. Lorraine Ggan. Olive Jane Ettinger. Ellen 

Prebbanow. Arlene Mueller. Marian Pientok. Bernice Benson. 




C571 




First Row: Nancy Roberts. Mary Huntzicker, Patricia Telford, Mary Ann Dodge. Marjorie Thull. 
Second Row: Arlcne Pick. Alice McVicar. 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



President 

MARY ANN DODGE 

Secretary 
ALICE McVICAR 



I 'ice President 
PATRICIA TELFORD 

Treasurer 

MARJORIE THULL 



Adviser 

MISS MICHAELS 



Every woman who enrolls as a Home Economies student is eligible for membership in 
the Home Economics Club. This important organization selects representatives to serve on the 
Home Economics Club council which arranges monthly programs. Each of these meetings 
presents a speaker on a subject relative to Home Economics education and its allied fields. 

In October, two representatives of the club attended the first meeting of the Wisconsin 
Home Economics College Club Convention at Stevens Point. Feature events of this year's activ- 
ities were the traditional Julc Katfec Lag and the annual "Green Tea," an all-college atfair pre- 
sented on St. Patrick's Day. 

C58] 




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Social Cife 




First Row: Phyllis Johnson. Maralyn Proksch. Miss Antrim, advise': Betty Lee. Joyce Wildner. 
Second Row: Miss Jeter, adviser; Mary Ann Dodge. Miss Van Ness, adviser; Peggy Pace. Mary Hunt- 
zicker. Patricia O'Connoi M ss Rogers, ac- 



INTERSOCIETY COUNCIL 



The Intersociety Council, consisting of the presidents, secretaries, and advisers from 
each of the four women's social groups, makes final decisions concerning common prob- 
lems of the social organizations. In addition, the Intersociety Council sponsors several social 
activities during the year. 

The traditional Intersociety Tea was held December 1 at Harvey Memorial where mem- 
bers of the four organizations entertained freshman women. Highlighting the year's events 
was the Intersociety Ball on March 8. Under silver stars and surrounded by blue skies, mem- 
bers of the four societies and guests danced to the music of Johnny Farwell and his Orches- 
tra. 



T6l D 



HYPER/AN 



President 

MARALYN PROKS 

Secretary 
MARGARET PACE 



I 'ice President 
[LA JKRDE 

Treasure r 
SHIRLEY IT.l R 



. / d riser 
MISS RASMUSS1 \ 

My, how time flics! The Hyperians have again completed a busy year of activities. At the 
I the year, eight pledges were welcomed at a formal initiation at the Anshus home. 

Homecoming was a busy time: we had fun creating our "most humorous" Homecoming float, 
and welcoming back alumnae at the Homecoming breakfast. We were especially happy, be- 
cause our new Hyperian sweaters had just arrived. 

During the year we sold stickers, magazine subscriptions, and Christmas cards to fortify 
the budget. As social workers, we collected Red Cress donations. Also, for the Red Cross 
Drive, we sponsored the St. Patrick's day dance. One of our all-college projects was the tradi- 
tional "Old Heidelberg Inn" tea. 



First Row: Mary Engebretson. Jeanne Gonsoim, Naomi Immei Lois Gladwell. Miss 

Rasmussen. adviser: la Jerde, Gloria Onarhe-m. Maralyn Proksch. 
Second Row: Peggy Pace. Myrth Gochnauer. Marian Lee. Clova De Ginno* Shirley Uber. Beverly 

Amundson. Shirley Wascen. Esther Larsen, Dorothy Condry, Beverly Fje 




C62] 




First Row: Betty Kramschuster. Polly Ann Boyle. Mary Huntzicker. Phyllis Johnson. Miss Rogers, adviser; 

Bette Schellin. Leone Ekholm, Margaret Trezona. 
Second Row: Jean Hagcmann. Eida Ellen McKenzie. Joy Erickson. Jeanne Greenlee. Miriam TeBeest. 

Lucille Nelson. Betty Kuenzl. Carol Widder. Ruth Klinner. Adele Anderson. 



PALLAS ATHENE 



President 

PHYLLIS JOHNSON 

Secretary 
MARY HUNTZICKER 



Vice President 

POLLYANN BOYL1 

Treasure; 
BETTE SCHELLIN 



Adviser 
MISS ROGERS 



The members of the Pallas Athene Society, now in its fifteenth year, speni many pleasant 
hours together while the tower clock ticked off the minutes of another school year. The P.A.'s 
got off to a flying start when they won the blue ribbon for the most beautiful float in the 
Homecoming parade. Their gala parties during the rushing season might well have brought 
them other awards. The group climaxed the social events of their year with the annual all- 
college Mayday tea. 

C63] 



PH/LOMATHEAN 



dent 

ELIZABETH LEE 

Secretary 

PATRICIA O'CONNOR 



Vice President 
VERNELLE LaPAGE 

Treasure) 

HELEN KRANZUSCH 



. Iihisir 

MISS VAN NESS 

Oldest of the four women's social organizations at Stout, the Philomathean society was 
first organized in 1912 as a women's literary society. Today, the organization provides an 
active social program in addition to its intense interest in good literature. 

This year, Philomathean began its social activities early in September by sponsoring the 
Philo Phrolic, an evening of dancing and entertainment which followed the festivities of 
the first football game. Philo also helped to make Homecoming a memorable weekend by 
sponsoring an alumni breakfast at Our Saviour's Lutheran Church. Rushing parlies, social 
meetings and an all-college tea also contributed to an active year for the Philomatheans. 



First Row: Betty Lee. Shirley Erickson. Vernelle LaPage. Betty r-asslinger. Mary Jane Spaulding. 
Second Row: Betty Miller. Arlenc Pick. Marjorie Sandman. Ellen Prebbanow, Patricia O'Connor. Helen 

K-a-^zusch. Audrey Andreassen. Miss Van Ness, adv -sret Hanson, Marjorie Thull. Ila Sa.ttc- 

Alice McVicar. 




i: 64 ] 




First Row: Priscillo Oettme^er. Maxine Houle. Marjoric Redmond. Nancy Roberts. Mary Thiler. Mary Foss. 
Second Row: Donna Haywood, Mary Ann Dodge, Jean Herring. Miss Jeter, adviser; Joyce Wiidner. Joan 

Thompson. Norma Olson. 
Third Row: Marceile Sander. Mary Chinnock. Mary Lou Ott. Mary Rudow, Helen Quilling, Morion Eldred. 

Pa: Ter'crd. Evelyn Schreibcr, Marjorie Powers. Evelyn Thommas Morion Ross. 



S. M. A. 



dent 

JOYCE WILDNER 

i 
MARY ANN DODGE 



Vice President 
[EAN HERRING 

[OAN THOM1 



Adviser 
MISS II I IK 



No one can be around the Stoul c impus very long before seeing signs of S.M.A. activity. 
This year, S.M.A. was represented among the officers of the Home Economics Club and of 
the S.S.A. At Homecoming, the group welcomed a record-breaking number of alumnae to its 
annual breakfast. Later in the year, an S.M.A., Mary Rudow. represented Stout as queen of 
Menomonie's Winter Carnival. In February, the club organized a Sadie Hawkins week and en- 
tertained students and faculty at a Valentine tea. 

During the winter, the group enjoyed a series of Christmas parties, ganing, and bridge 

parties. Spring pledging ceremonies climaxed the year— a happy one of many activil 



F. 0. B. 



President 

HARLAN ADAMS 

Secretary 

RUDOLPH WEC.NKR 



Vice President 

DONALD GRUNSTED 

Treasurer 
JOSEPH SERFLEK 



. Id risers 
MR. (;()()[), MR. JOHNSON 

Although it did not become active, after the inactivity of the war years, until the second 
semester this year, the F.O.B. lost little time in again becoming a prominent campus organi- 
zation. The F.O.B., the oldest of all men's groups on the campus, again took an active part in 
all school affairs, evidencing a major interest, as in years past, in athletics. High-lighting its 
accomplishments was the revival of the traditional K.F.S.- F.O.B. basketball game. F.O.B. 
emerged from the grudge game with a victory, after nosing out the K.F.S. in over-time play. 
On Honors Day, the F.O.B. made its annual award of a scholarship to the highest ranking 
athlete of the year. 



First Row: Thomas O'Conncll. Walter Dusold. Donald Grunsted. Mr. Good, adviser; Harlan Adams. 
Rudolph Wegncr. Joe Serflek. Roy Seitz. Joseph Krajnak. 

Second Row: William Andrews. Clifford Ingwell. Luke Anderson. Richard Trczona, MaHatte Holtz. James 
Teigen. Mr. Johnson, adviser; Fred Quilling. 

Third Row: Karl Seitz. Clifford Burtness. Clifford Moc. Walter Cave. Howard Binstock. Donald McKibben. 
Robert DuCharme. 




r.w.] 




First Row: Paul Ericltson, Richard McKinney. Dr. Stephan. adviser: Benjamin Sanders, William Christianson. 

Eldon Everetts. 
Second Row: Joseph Bertoletti. Arnie Lein. Richard Rothweiler. Martin Brown. Gordon Snoeyenbos. 

William Masek. Robert Burke. Robert Merk. Robert Breitzman. 



K. F. S. 



I'k tident 
RICHARD McKINNEY 



Secretary-Treasurer 
ROBERT MKRK 



Advisers 

DR. STKPHAN. MR. IIROWN 



As its name symbolizes, K.F.S. promotes knowledge, friendship, and social life among the 
college men. The fraternity was organized in 1930. A hearty group of socially-minded men, the 
K.F.S. makes many excellent contributions to the social life of the college. This year it began 
the s.cond decade of its existence by contributing more than usual to the life of Stout. "The 
First." the first post-war formal dance at Stout, was sponsored by K.F.S. It also earned another 
"Oscar" by entering a prize-winning float in the homecoming parade. Since 1936, it has given 
an annual scholarship to the Stout man who displays the greatest skill in his work, the highest 
scholarship, and the most admirable attitude toward the college. 



SIGMA 



President 

BERNARD BAETSEN 

Secretary 

ROBERT HULL 



Vice President 

RICHARD KURSHINSKY 

Treasurer 

ARTHUR MEDTLIE 



. tdvisert 
MR. NELSON, MR. PRICE 



Newest of men's social organizations on the campus is Sigma. A charter was first issued 
to Sigma in the fall of 1944 and was approval by the Committee on Student Relations the fol- 
lowing May. From a charter membership of sixteen, Sigma has grown to be an integral part 
of Stout's social life and has contributed increasingly to all college activities. Most memorable 
ol this years activities was the hard-time dance presented in true harvest time spirit. 



First Row: Franl Dummann. Arthur Meat ic Robert Hull. Bernard Bactsen, Richard Kursr Nelson, 

adviser: Otto Roclce. 
Second Row: Wesley Kuckulc. Ray Johnson. Joseph Mocosni, John Perushek. Eugene Skjegstad. Giles 

Woolf Robert Thompto. Eugene V 
Third Row: r mei Wagner. Roland Kehrberg. Charles Scharr. Joseph Winek. Paul Axelscn. 








Rrst Row: Esther Larsen, Emma DeCanter. Dr. Stephan. adviser; Ru:h Aa-css Robert Hull. Elsie Kanouse 

Elaine Voss. 
Second Row: Marilyn Haywood. Catherine Waters. Patricia Aug- ■ Oummann. Virginia Russell. 

dies Woolf. Eleanor Busse. Joe Bert ; -garet Cox. Vj- 

Third Row: Harold Satterlund. Gordon Snoeyenbos. Robert Burke. Che'les Scharr. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 



President 
ROBERT HULL 

Secretary-Treasurer 
ELEANOR BUSSE 



I 'ice President 

RUTH AANESS 

Adviser 
DR. STEPHAN 



With the myriad of problems facing the world today, it is imperative that students be 
intensely interested in the world, its people, and its problems. The International Relations 
Club has fostered a social organization which meets once a month to discuss a topic of im- 
portance in world events. This year, veterans of all the war theaters returned to college. 
Many of the men gave informative talks to the club. In March, the I.R.C. sent its president, 
Ruth Aaness, to the mid-west International Relations conference held at Oshkosh, where she 
participated in group discussions on international affairs. 

C 69 "J 




First Row: Phyllis Sperstad. Rose Olbert. Margaret Pennington. Florence Teegarden. Jean Lindblad. 
Second Row: Harriet Okuyama. Shirley Schnitzlcr. Dolores Mcrtz. Miss Antrim, adviser: Rosann Bongcy. 
Patricia Moore. Audrey Vigerust. 

Third Row: Marilyn Haywood. Phyllis Walsh. Zona Hines. Mildred Hanson. Betty Achterkirch. Doris 

Zimmerman. Irene Traxler. Genevieve Goff. Lucille Lindberg. 
Fourth Row: Eileen Dillman. Henrietta Guelzow. Violet Schnitzlcr. Janice Jewel. Audrey Conklin. Carol 

Bagstad. Marian Lemlce. Ruth Mathey. Rose Krog. Phyllis Onsager. Bemice Johnson. La Verne Parske. 

Lorraine Schlough. 

Fifth Row: June Edeberg. Philena Elliott. La Verne Mertz. Mary Seifert. Betty Stahl. Olive Brownell. Naomi 
bcherz. Mary Lou Fnberg. Gloria Riemer. Virginia Russell. Ilene Beyrer. Doris Counsell. 

Sixth Row: Shirley Soderberg. Elaine Leemkuil. Lorraine Cigan. Grace Smith. Bemice Benson. Barbara 
Zwaska. Dolores Eggebrccht. Beverly Rusdal. Arlene Mueller. Mildred Frase. Jean Woodruff. Ruth 
Aaness. Dorothy Beyrer. Irma Curtiss. 



W. A. A. 



President 
DOLORES MERTZ 

Secretary 
SHIRLEY SCHNITZLER 



Vice President 

RUTH AANESS 

Treasurer 

MILDRED FRASE 



. Idviscr 
MISS ANTRIM 

All tattered and torn, the Freshman women became acquainted with the Women's Ath- 
letic Association of The Stout Institute through a hobo get-acquainted party. After joining the 
W.A.A., the members participated in games with teams of the dormitories and societies. The 
W.A.A. should be congratulated for sponsoring the first intercollegiate basketball game for 
women ever to be played at The Stout Institute. On March 30, the W.A.A. basketball team 
played against the Eau Claire State Teachers' College W.A.A. quintet. The game was the 
featured attraction of the all-college sports night. A banquet at which letters were awarded and 
the new officers were installed climaxed the W.A.A. activities for 1945-46. 



r.7oj- 



y. w. c. a. 



Pn sident 

VALARIE PAFF 

Secrt tary 

SHIRLEY WASEEN 

Miss HARPKR. MISS TRULLINGER 






Vice President 
MARGARET COX 
surer 
SHIRLEY SCHNITZLER 

MISS McC A I. MONT 



The Y.W.C.A. made its first contact with new women students through the Campus Sis- 
ter party. It sponsored the "Y" Corridor Sale and sold hot dogs at the homecoming football 
game. Most important, however, was its sending representatives to the annual Ihuhapi Area 
Conference. A major project in the year's program was the preparation and distribution of g 
erous Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets. The group also aided destitute college students of 
other nations through its sponsoring the World Student Service Fund. The traditional Mother 
and Daughter Banquet and the senior picnic were, as usual, the events which concluded the 
year's activities. 



First Row: Miss Harper, adviser: Miss McCalmont adviser: Miss Trullinger. adviser. 

Second Row: Harriet Okuyama. Lorraine Nelson. Rose Scianni. Mildred Hanson. Zona Hines. Marilyn 

Haywood. Lucille Lindberg, Margaret Pennington. Rose Krog, Ruth Mathey. 
Third Row: Henrietta Gueizow. Peggy Edberg, Audrey Conklin. Janice Jewel. Carol Bagstad. Jean Cantrell. 

June Edeberg. Margaret Cox. 
Fourth Row: Virginia Jackson. Phyllis Miller. V.olet Schnitzler. Dorothy Kopp. OUe Browne!!, Naomi 

Scherz, Mary Louise Friberg. Gloria Riemer. Helen Melville. Itene Beyrer. Jean Lindblad. 
Fifth Row: Betty Umbehocke?, Shirley Waseen. Lois Klusmeyer. Barbara Zwaska. Dolces Eggebrecht 

Beverly Rusdal. Mildred Frase, Jean Woodruff. Dorothy Beyrer. Irma Curtiss. 




c:iJ 



TAINTER HALL 





Mrs. Charlotte Gist 



Among the memories of many Stout women. Taintcr Hall 
rates a prominent place. During the past year, there were the 
usual number of after-hour parties, kitchen raids, and dancing 
sessions; and the girls found that the telephone and the door- 
bell received increasing use as the year progressed. Mr. Tustison 
taught many of the girls the art of playing a good game of 
bridge. All of us learned the importance of front windows a: 
ten-thirty! 




L-->J 



TAINTER ANNEX 





Mrs. Mac F. Moses 



Seventy-five Freshman women under one roof — yes, that's 
Taintcr Annex. The Annex, like any college hall, was an ex- 
citing place most of the time. Bridge and knitting led the fads 
for the year, with experiments in hair tinting a runner-up. The 
installation of a coke machine was one of the high lights of the 
year. But, of course, as in other years, phone calls and callers 
headed the list of exciting incidents for every dorm girl. 




:A 







C76D 



EICHELBERGER HALL 




Wc moved into Eichelberger Hall last fall when our dormi- 
tory was still being prepared for occupancy. Soon the dorm was 
presentable, with the stairway the pride and joy of all. Our 
officers were Betty Kuenzl, prexy; Adeline Schaefer, vice-prexy: 
[la Sautter, secretary; and Verena Price, treasurer. At the end 
of the semester, many of us moved to other rooms to accommo- 
date the juniors who moved in from Lynwood. But we were un- 
easy until Mrs. Trezona, our house mother, quieted our fears 
regarding the double-decker bunks. 




Mt$. Margaret Trezona 




C~J 



INDEX 



Aasmundrud, Aria Fac, 25, 75 
Aaness, Ruth, 21, 48, 56, 69, 70, 74 
Abe. Yaso, 31 

Achterkirch, Betty, 26, 70, 76 
Adams, Harlan, 16, 42, 66 
Amberg, Mary Jean, 16, 74 
Amber, Mary Jane, 55 
Amundson, Beverly, 16, 56, 62, 74 
Anderson, Adele, 25, 57, 63, 75 
Anderson, Chester, 16 
Anderson, Luther, 3 1 , 66 
Anderson, William, 21 
Andreassen, Audrey, 64 
Andrews, William, 66 
Antrim, Keturah, 9, 61, 70 
Arneson, Herman, 10 
Anderholm, Ferd, 26, 40 
Aughnay, Patricia, 26, 69, 76 
Ausman, Donald, 40 
Axelsen, Paul, 24, 56, 68 

Baetsen, Bernard, 2 1 , 68 

Baetz, Arthur, 26, 52 

Bagstad, Carol, 26, 70, 71, 76 

Baird, John, 21 

Baker, William, 10, 51, 52 

Barisas, Bernard, 3 I 

Barnard, David, 16, 51 

Barnhart, Herbert, 26, 56 

Battenberg, Rexford, 16, 50 

Becker, Minnie, 12 

Becker, Richard, 40 

Benson, Bernice, 26, 57, 70, 75 

Benson, Willard. 56 

Bertelsen, Arnold, 26, 40, 56 

Bertoletti, Joseph, 67, 69 

Beyrer, Dorothy, 26, 54, 70, 71, 76 

Beyrer, llene, 26, 70, 71. 76 

Binstock, Howard, 16 

Bongey, Jack, 26 

Bongey, Rosann, 26, 70 

Bottonley, William, 56 

Bowman, Clyde A., 8 

Boyle, Pollyann, 16, 63, 74 

Brantner, Donna, 26 76 

Bray, Joyce, 26, 76 

Breitzman, Robert, 67 

Breicha, James, 26 

Brill, Donald, 2 1 , 56 

Bronken, Anita, 16 

Brown, Arthur G., 10 

Brown, Dean, 3 I 

Brown, Martin, 16, 40. 67 

Brown, Oral, I 6 

Brown, Richard, 16, 50, 51 

Brownell, Marjorie, 16, 54, 74 

Brownell, Olive, 26, 54, 70, 71 

Brune, Howard 40, 54 

Brusen, Carroll, 29 

Bryant, Dr. George, 12 

Burke. Robert, 16, 67, 69 

Buchanan, Louise, 10 

Burtness, Clifford. 21 

Busse, Eleanor, 16, 69, 74 

Callahan, Gertrude L, 10, 53 
Cameron, Bruce, 21,51 
Campbell, Dora, 3 1 , 49 
Cantrell, Jean, 25, 52, 57, 71, 77 



Carlsen, Darvey E., 10, 51 

Carson, Lillian, 10 

Cass, Donald, 21 

Chaffee, Eugene, 26, 40 

Chaffee, Vera, 26 

Chase, John, 3 I 

Chinnock, Dwight, 10. 53 

Chinnock, Mary, 25, 53, 65 

Christensen, Irving, 29 

Christianson, Maurice, 21 

Christianson, William, 2 1 , 67 

Christopherson, James, 16, 50 

Cigan, Lorraine, 26, 57, 70, 75 

Clark, Frank, 5 I 

Condry, Dorothy, 21, 62, 74 

Conklin, Audrey, 26, 70, 71, 76 

Connell, Victor, 26 

Conway, Martin, 29 

Cooke, Harold R., 10, 54, 56 

Counsell, Doris, 27, 56, 70, 76 

Cox, Eleanor H., 10 

Cox, Margaret, 21, 52, 69, 71. 74 

Cruise, Winnona, 10 

Cummings, Alberta, 27, 57 

Curtiss, Irma, 25, 70. 71, 77 

Cyr, Jean, 27, 56 

Damgaard, Hazel, 27, 56 

Davidson, Marvin. 16 

DeBoer, Mildred, 16, 56, 74 

DeCanter, Emma, 69 

Dengel, Betty, 27, 57, 76 

Dillman, Eileen, 27, 70, 76 

Dillman, Jean, 76 

Dodge, Mary Ann, 21, 48, 52, 58. 61 

Drake. Douglas, 31, 50 

Dresden, William, 16, 50 

Drivas, Maria, 17, 48, 49. 74 

Dummann, Frank, 17, 47, 49, 68, 69 

Dusold, Walter, 42, 66 

Dyke, Eugene, 28, 54 

Edberg, Peggy, 17, 48, 56, 74 
Edeberg, June:, 25, 70, 71, 77 
Eggebrecht, Dolores, 27, 70, 7 1 , 76 
EggerJ, Elmer, 29 
Ekholm, Leone, 17, 48, 63 
Eldred, Marian, 25, 47, 53, 65 
Elliott, Philena, 27, 52, 70, 76 
Engebretson, Mary, 17, 48, 55, 56. 62 
Erickson, Albert, 21 
Erickson, Joy, 25, 56, 63, 75 
Erickson, Marceline, 10, 49 
Erickson, Paul, 15, 51, 52, 67 
Erickson, Shirley, 54, 64, 77 
Ettinger, Olive, 27, 52, 57, 77 
Everetts, Eldon, 17, 40, 42, 67 

Fausett, Arlene, 27, 52, 57, 76 
Fjelsted, Beverly, 21. 52, 62, 74 
Flanagan, William, 3 I 
Foss, Mary, 21, 65 
Frase, Mildred, 25, 70, 71, 77 
Friberg, Mary, 27, 70, 71 
Froeba, Alice, 25, 57, 75 
Froggatt, Lillian M., 12 
Fryklund, Verne C, 6 
Funk, B. M„ 12 



Gandt, Richard, 29 
Gassen, Carl, 2 I 
Gehrke, Paul, 17 
Gerondale, Kitty, 27, 74 
Gikling, Beverly, 52, 57 
Ginnow, Clova Dell, 17, 48, 55, 56, 62, 74 
Gladwell, Lois, 62, 74 
Gochnauer, Myrth, 17, 49, 62. 74 
Goff, Genevieve, 25, 70, 77 
Gonsolin, Jeanne, 25, 56, 62 
Good, Harry F., 10, 66 
Goodrich, John, 42 
Gorr, Walter, 29 
Gould, Marjorie, 21, 57, 74 
Govm, Donald, 27 
Govin, Neil, 27 
Green, Daniel, 10 

Greenlee, Jeanne, 25, 53, 54, 57, 63, 74 
Grube, Frank, 10 
Grunsted, Donald, 42, 66 
Guelzow, Henrietta, 27, 52, 54, 56, 70, 71 
76 

Hadden, Ann, 10 

Haggemann, Jean, 17, 63, 74 

Hall, Russell, 29, 54 

Halvorson, William, 27, 40, 42, 54, 56 

Hansen, Elizabeth, 27, 76 

Hanson, Margaret, 25, 54, 64, 77 

Hanson, Mildred, 27, 70, 71, 76 

Happel, June, 74 

Harlander, Audrey, 27, 52, 56, 76 

Harper, Margaret E., 10, 71 

Harris. John, 27, 40 

Harshman, Avis. 27, 54, 57 
°~> Harshman, Joan, 54 

Hart, Annabelle, 21, 56 

Hasslinger, Elizabeth, 17, 64, 74 

Haworth, Mervin, 3 I 

Haywood, Donna, 17, 65, 74 

Haywood. Marilyn, 27, 69, 70, 71, 76 

Hazarian, Parr.ick, 51 

Heebink, Marilyn, 27, 52. 53. 56, 76 

Heidmann, Carole, 27 

Hensey, Lois, 27, 76 

Hendrickson, George, 29 

Hendrickson, Torval, 27, 53 

Herring, Jean, 17, 48, 65, 74 

Hines, Zona, 27, 70, 71, 76 

Hoffman, Phyllis, 27, 76 
78 Hodgkins, Edwin, 31 

Hogue, Kathleen, 25, 75 

Hoitz. Marlatte, 21, 66 

Horton, Amy, 27, 76 

Houle, Mary Ann, 27 

Houle, Mary Maxine, 25, 56, 65 

Houle, Patricia, 27 

Howisson, Buelah, 12 

Huber, Mark, 27,52 

Hughes, Byron, 17, 51, 56 

Hull, Robert, 15, 68. 69 

Huntzicker, Mary. 17, 48, 56, 58, 61, 63, 
74 

Immel, Naomi, 25, 55, 56, 62, 74 
Ingram, Donald, 2 I 
Ingwell, Clifford, 66 

Jackson, Robert, 27 
Jackson, Virginia, 2 % 7, 71, 76 



[7H] 



INDEX 



Jain, Dorothea, 17, 74 

Jennrich, Vernice, 17, 55, 74 

Jerde, lla, 22, 48, 52, 62, 74 

Jeter, Lillian, 10, 61, 65 

Jewel, Janice, 27, 70, 71, 76 

Johnson, Bernice, 27, 70, 77 

Johnson, Dorothy, 10 

Johnson, E. Bernice, 25, 76 

Johnson, Elaine, 57, 76 

Johnson, Mildred, 22, 53, 57, 74 

Johnson, Phyllis. 22, 52, 56. 61, 63, 74 

Johnson, Ray C, 10, 42, 40, 66 

Johnson, Ray F., 25, 40, 52, 68 

Johnston, June, 27, 53, 76 

Kancr, Roy, 17 

Kanouse, Elsie, 22, 69 

Kehrbers, Roland, 27, 40, 56, 68 

Keith, Floyd, I I 

Kelley, Helen. 27, 74 

Kelton, Jean, 76 

Ketterl, John, 40 

King. Thomas, 56 

Klinner, Ruth, 22, 48, 52, 63, 74 

Klusmeyer, Lois, 22, 57, 71, 74 

Kniffen, S. James, 27 

Knowles, Ruth, 27, 76 

Knutson, Clinton, 18 

Koch, Clinton, 3 I 

Kopischkie, Dorothy, 22, 52, 54, 74 

Kopp, Dorothy. 27, 54, 71, 76 

Kothlow, Janet, 12 

Kra g h, Donna, 27, 54, 71, 76 

Krajnak, Joseph, 66 

Krall, Irene, 77 

Kramschuster, Betty, 18, 48, 49, 63, 74 

Kranzusch, Helen, 22, 49, 64 

Kranzusch, Ray F., II, 50 

Kros, Rose, 25, 56. 70, 71, 77 

Kuckuk, Wesley, 25, 68 

Kuenzl, Betty, 25, 52, 63, 77 

Kurshinsky, Richard, 68 

Kvoul, James, 54 

LaPa 3 e, Vernelle, 18. 49, 64, 74 
Larsen, Esther, 18. 47, 48, 62, 69, 74 
Larson, Douglas, 27 
Lee. Elizabeth, 18, 49, 56, 61, 64, 74 
Lee, Marian, 18, 48, 62, 74 
Lcemkuil, Elaine. 28, 56, 70. 75 
Lemke, Marian, 28, 76 
Lemon, Melvin, 56 
Leopold, Wayne, 18, 40 
Lien, Arnold, 31, 52, 67 
Lindbcrg, Lucille, 28, 70, 71, 76 
Lindblad, Jean, 28. 70. 71, 76 

McCalmont, Mary M., II, 71 
McDowell, Buelah, 22, 52, 74 
McKenzie, Eida Ellen, 74 
McKibben, Donald, 18, 51 
McKinney, Richard, 20, 67 
McVicar, Alice, 25, 56, 58, 64, 77 
Marshall, Anne, I I 
Masek, William, 22. 67 
Mathey, Ruth, 28, 70, 71, 76 
Medtlie, Arthur, 22, 49, 53, 56, 68 
Medtlie, Esther, 28, 52 
Melrose, Robert, 56 



Melville, Helen, 25, 57, 71, 77 

Mcrk, Robert, 22, 67 

Mcrtz, Dolores, 18, 70, 74 

Mertz, LaVerne, 18, 70, 74 

Mettel, Ea.l. 31 

Meyer, Mary Lou, 22, 74 

Michaels, Ruth E., 9 

Miller, Betty, 25, 52, 64, 77 

Miller, Eugene, 22, 25, 42, 68 

Miller, Milton, 22 

Miller, Phyllis, 28, 54, 71, 76 

Milnes, H. C, II 

Mocogni, Joseph, 25, 52, 68 

Moe, Clifford, 32 

Moe, Kilmer, 28 

Moore, Mildred, I I 

Moore, Patricia. 28, 70 

Mueller, Arlene, 28. 57, 70, 76 

Mueller, Lee, 28 

Mueller, Lothar, 18, 51 

Mueller, Marian, 25, 62, 75 

Murphy, Jean, 28, 54, 56, 76 

Nagler, Harold. 56 

Neitzel. Myrtle, 18 

Nelson, Lorraine, 71, 75 

Nelson, Lucille, 22, 53, 56, 63, 74 

Nelson, Norma, 28, 76 

Nelson, Paul C, II, 68 

Nueman, Ruth, 28, 76 

Nicol, Max, 29 

Nylander, Jean, 28. 76 

Oass, Gordon, 3 I 

O'Brien, Gertrude M., 12 

O'Connell, Thomas, 22, 66 

O'Connor, Patricia, 22, 61, 64, 74 

Ode, Louis, 22 

Oetting, E. R., II 

Oettmeier, Priscilla. 22, 54, 65, 74 

Okuyama, Harriet, 28, 70, 71, 75 

Olbert. Rose, 28, 56, 70, 76 

Olson, Mary, 28, 57 

Olson, Melvin, 29 

Olson, Norma, 65 

Olson, Yvonne, 18, 28, 74 

Olstad, Harry, 32 

Onarheim. Gloria, 18, 62, 74 

Onsager, Phyllis, 28, 70, 76 

Osborn, Harold, 28. 56 

Ostrum, France-s. 55, 56, 76 

Ott, Mary. 25, 55, 56, 65. 77 

Pace, Peggy, 18, 56, 61, 62, 74 

Paff, Valarie, 18, 48, 49, 69, 74 

Pangborn, Donald, 42 

Parske. LaVerne, 23, 70, 74 

Pauly, Catherine, 23. 52. 74 

Pennington, Margaret, 25, 56, 70, 71 

Perushek, John, 40, 68 

Peterman, James, 32 

Peterson, Harvey, 28, 40 

Petryk, Joseph, 18, 50 

Petryk, William, 24. 40 

Pick, Arlene, 24, 52, 58, 64, 75 

Pientok, Manan, 28, 57, 76 

Powell. Paul, 32 

Powers, Marjorie, 23, 47, 65, 74 

Prcbbanow, Ellen, 25, 52, 57, 64, 77 



Price, Merle M., 8 

Price, Verena, 25, 77 

Proksch, Maralyn, 18, 61, 62, 74 

Proudlock, Deima, 12 

Prust, Zenas, 23, 42, 50 

Putzier, Elmer, 23 

Quilling, Fred, 32, 66 
Quilling, Helen, 24, 56, 65 

Rasmussen, Sigrid, II, 53, 62 

Ray, J. Edgar, II 

Redmond, Marjorie, 23. 65, 74 

Renk, Norman, 29, 56 

Riccelli, John, 19 

Rich, C. L, I I 

Richardson, Charles, 23 

Riemer, Gloria, 28, 70, 71, 76 

Ristow, Harvey, 23 

Rittler, Mary, 28, 54, 56, 76 

Roberts, Nancy, 15, 58, 65, 74 

Rocke, Otto, 24, 40 

Rodey, Louis, 23 

Rogers, Mabel, I I, 61, 63 

Roen, Howard, 19, 50 

Roether, Donald, 28, 40 

Ross, Marian, 23, 52, 65 

Rothweiler, Richard, 24, 67 

Rudow, John, 29 

Rudow, Mary, 24, 65 

Rumsay, Robert, 32, 51 

Rusdal, Beverly, 28, 70, 7 1 , 76 

Russell, Virginia, 23, 52, 53, 69, 70, 74 

Ryan, Rita. 19, 49, 74 

Sandcer, Ernest, 19 
Sander, Marccile, 20, 52, 65, 74 
Sanders, Benjamin, 23, 24, 67 
Sandman, Marjorie, 24, 64, 77 
Satterlund, Harold, 28, 56, 69 
Sautter, lla, 24, 54, 64, 77 
Saxhaug, Edward, 23 
Schaefer, Adeline, 24, 54, 56, 77 
Schaefer. Janice, 23, 52, 55, 56, 74 
Schank, Kenneth, 28 
Scharr, Charles, 19, 49, 68, 69 
Schattschneider, Edwin, 56 
Schellin, Bette, 23, 63, 74 
Schellin, James, 28, 40 
Scherz, Naomi, 28, 56, 70, 71, 76 
Scheuerell, Edward, 32 
Schlough, Lorraine, 28, 56, 70 
Schlough, Wesley, 32 
Schmidt, Violet, 29 
Schneck, Maurice, 29 
Schnitzler, Shirley, 25, 52, 70. 77 
Schnitzler, Violet, 28, 70, 71, 76 
Schreiber, Evelyn, 19, 65 
77 Schwalbe, Jean. 28, 52. 57, 76 
Schwebke, Howard, 32, 51 
Schwebke. Phyllis, I I 
Schwellenbach, Clyde, 28, 52, 53 
Scianni, Rose, 28, 57, 71, 75 
Seifert, Dale, 54 
Se.fert. Mary. 28, 57. 70, 75 
Seitz, Karl, 23 
Seitz, Roy, 66 

Serflek, Joseph, 19, 40, 42, 66 
Skjegstad, Eugene. 28, 54, 68 



1:79 3 



INDEX 



Slamar. Emily. 24 77 

Smith. Bcnita. 1 1. 48 

Smith. Grace. 28. 70. 75 

Sodcrberg. George. 1 1 

Sodcrbcrg. Iris. 76 

Sodcrberg. Shirley. 28. 54. 70. 76 

Sontag. Edria. 48. 74 

Snocycnbos. Gordon. 19. 67. 69 

Spauldmg. Mary Jane. 19. 52. 64. 74 

Speidel. Sarah. 12. 54 

Spencer. Stephen. 28 

Sperstad. Phyllis. 29. 70 

Stagcman. Ardis, 29. 76 

Stahl. Betty. 29. 57. 70. 75 

Stephan. A. Stephen. 1 1. 67. 69 

Sterner, Jeanne, 29 

Stevens. Harriet. 19. 52. 74 

Stevens. Odell. 29. 40 

Strand. Myrtle. 12 

Strozinsky. H. O.. 12 

Sweitzer. Arthur. 29. 40. 42 

TeBecst. Miriam. 24, 63, 75 

Teegarden. Florence. 29, 54. 56. 70 

Tcigen. James. 66 

Telford. Patricia. 20. 48. 49. 52, 58. 65. 

Theiler, Mary, 65. 77 

Thomas, Evelyn. 25. 56. 65 

Thomas, Robert, 50 



Thompson. Joan. 23. 52. 54. 55. 74 
Thompson. Phyllis. 29. 76 
Thompto. Robert. 25. 40. 56. 68 
Thorson. Marvin. 40 
Thull. Marjoric. 24, 54. 58. 64. 77 
Timmcrman. James. 51 
Tinetti. George. 56 
T.rpak. Helen. 29. 56. 75 
Trader. Irene. 25. 52. 57. 70. 75 
Trezona. Margaret. 19. 63. 77 
Trezona. Richard. 32. 40. 66 
Trullinger. Gladys. II. 71 
Tustison. F. E.. 1 1 

Ubcr. Shirley. 15. 62. 74 
Ulsrud. Yvonne. 19 
Umbehocker. Betty. 23, 71. 74 

Van Ness. Hazel. II. 61, 64 
Van Ranst. Arlyss. 29. 52. 56. 77 
Vigerust. Audrey. 29. 52. 70 
Vitz. Martin. 25. 56 
Voss. Elaine. 25. 56. 74 

Wagner. Elmer, 68 
74 Waldhart. Clyde. 29 
Walsh, Phyllis. 29. 70. 76 
Waseen. Shirley. 20. 56. 62. 71. 74 
Waters. Catherine. 69. 76 



Wegner. Rudolph. 19. 66 
Welch. Teresa Jean. 29 
Wcndt. Frank. 23. 51 
Wendt. Herbert. 23. 51. 52 
Wereley. Eugene. 32 
Wcmerberg. Kurt. 40 
West. Rev. Robe-:. 32 
Wheeler. Mark. 32 
Wicklund. Carl. 19 
Widder. Carol. 24. 56. 63. 75 
Widvey. Sybil. 19, 74 
Wildncr. Joan. 29. 52. 56 
Wildner. Joyce. 19. 52. 61. 65 
Williams. Oonald. 40 
W,lson. Dorothy. 29 
Winci. Joseph. 19. 68 
Winston. Agnes. 12 
Wiseman. Gerald. 29 40 
Wolff. Erwin. 19 
Woodruff. Jean. 29. 70. 71. 76 
Woolf. Giles. 23. 51, 53. 68, 69 
Worman: Darby. 32 
Alvin. 42 

Yorkston. Robert. 29 

Zcpp. Francis. 29. 52. 54 
Zimmerman. Doris. 29. 57. 70. 75 
Zwaska. Barbara. 29, 57, 70. 71, 75 



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